Welcome to the Dorman High School Media Center Blog. The information provided on this blog is intended for Dorman High School students. We hope the information is helpful and relevant. Please feel free to contact us if you have questions.

Monday, May 12, 2008

Summer Read '08 Starts June 1 and ends August 31

UPDATE: Dorman students and faculty read 421,421 pages in the NBLU summer reading challenge.
NBLU Winners:
Top Faculty Winner: Mrs. Sheila Curry read 22,888
Top Student Winner: John Whitlock read 29,600
Luck of the Draw Winners: Mr. Lewis Terry and Maisy Bolton won Mellow Mushroom gift cards.
No Book Left Unread Summer Reading Challenge
Participate
for prizes to
Mellow Mushroom & More
Click HERE for more information.
Blogging starts June 1.

Important!
1. Blog at least 4 sentences/book
2. Include your real name.
3. Include the number of pages of each book you read.
4. Blog as many times as you like.
See the first blog example for a sample format.

30 comments:

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
New Moon by Stephenie Meyer
563 Pages

After reading Twilight by Stephenie Meyer, I immediately started New Moon to find out what happens to Bella and Edward. Will it be a happily-ever-after ending after all? I was a bit disappointed in the first few chapters of New Moon. All the mystery, tension and conflict of Twilight was replaced with a sappy, "you're my soul mate" kind of love story. Well, that didn't last long and then the drama ensues. So, keep reading after the first few chapters and you'll be in for a treat!

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer
629 Pages

With a fast-paced plot and unexpected twists, Eclipse keeps readers intrigued from the first chapter. Meyer is somehow able to create a fantastical world in ordinary Forks, Washington in which vampires and werewolves seem perfectly believable. In fact, readers will not only believe in these mythical monsters but will find themselves pulling for these “bloodsuckers” and “dogs” despite themselves. With the next installment in this series not to be released until August 2008, readers may enjoy reading this interview with the author found at http://www.amazon.com/Twilight-Stephenie-Meyer/dp/1904233651. Also, visit the author’s website at www.stepheniemeyer.com/ for more information about the author and her work. Until August…

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
What Happened to Cass Mcbride? by Gail Giles
211 Pages

“Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me.” –Or so the saying goes. What Happened to Cass Mcbride? compellingly argues the power of words. As the “it” girl who has it all, Cass thinks, “I never thought that a few careless words scrawled on a piece of paper could put two people in graves.” (51) Will Cass find the right words to stay alive? Read this fast-paced psychological thriller to find out!

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Dead Connection by Charlie Price
225 Pages

While an interesting read, Dead Connection lacks a cohesive plot with well-developed characters. With so many characters playing significant roles in this story, the reader may well begin to lose track of character names and who did what. Nonetheless, despite these shortcomings, the author creates a sympathetic protagonist in Murray who can communicate with the dead. When a fellow student goes missing, Murray begins to hear a new voice in the cemetery asking for his help. But will he figure out the mystery in time? This whodunit thriller will keep you reading even while trying to keep track of who’s who.

Mrs. Barron said...

Way to go Mrs. Layne. Your are doing a great job. Keep up the hard work...

Mrs. Layne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Avalon High by Meg Cabot
355 pages (large print version)

In typical Cabot style, Avalon High is a fun, intriguing story about high school life and fairytale endings. Readers will enjoy the first-person narration of quirky Ellie Harrison, a new student at Avalon High, as she uncovers one mystery after another and finds love along the way. Somehow Cabot manages to combine humor, mystery, romance, and the legend of Camelot in this modern day fairytale. If you liked Princess Diaries, you will love Avalon High. Will the big screen be next?

Mrs. Layne said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock
274 Pages

Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock is a classic coming of age story about a 16 year old tomboy named D.J. and her difficulties working on the family farm and dealing with family issues. The first 130 pages provided background on story characters to give readers a rich sense of these characters. While this introduction did not grab me, the plot definitely became more interesting when it expanded beyond the daily chores on the farm. Still, for me the story was a bit didactic and did not always ring true. For instance, do 16 year olds still say, “Duh”? While I enjoyed the ending and may even read the sequel, at times the word choices of characters seemed inauthentic.

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
The Nature of Jade by Deb Caletti
288 Pages

The Nature of Jade by Deb Caletti is the seventh book I have read of the twenty SC Young Adult Book Award nominees. While most have been remarkable, because of its authentic and insightful look into the life of a young woman suffering with anxiety and panic, this book has been my favorite so far. Readers who have suffered similar symptoms will readily identify with Jade Deluna, the driven, A.P. taking, type A teen trying to ace life. Through her panic, pain and growth, we see truths essential to becoming whole and truly living despite all of our fears. I know, sounds mesmerizing right? Well, for you romantic types, a possible romance further enhances the complete well-rounded, perfection of this book. This is a must-read for all of us Jades of the world!

Sue Fitzgerald said...

Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock
274 pages

I just finished the wonderful coming of age story about a fifteen year-old Wisconsin farm girl who wants to play football. This novel seems to include a little romance, difficulties in family life, and issues that teens experience in everyday life. This book is a pleasant quick and easy read.

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Bad Kitty by Michele Jaffe
268 Pages

I would like to dedicate this next review to Mrs. Barron and Poppy. In the words of our main character Jas Callihan, you two are soooo MASTERCARD--Priceless!

I can only describe Bad Kitty by Michele Jaffe in one word--Superfun!!! An amateur sleuth, Jas always seems to find herself in life and danger situations in which she and her fabulous friends are somehow able to maneuver out of the worst of situations and save the day. Humorous. Current. Hip. Jas and Co. is the modern day gang from Scooby Doo with their very own version of the Mystery Machine. Bad Kitty is so American Express--Don't leave home without it this summer! >< ><

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Scrambled Eggs at Midnight by Brad Barkley and Heather Hepler
262 Pages

Have you ever felt completely alone in the world? Have you ever needed roots--a sense of being at home? For Calliope and her mother, home has been more than 20 different places in four years. When Cal finally finds a place that she loves and begins growing roots in Asheville, NC, her mother once again is ready to hit the road. Can Cal convince her mother to stay or will her life once again be turned upside down? Read Scrambled Eggs at Midnight for a genuine, timeless story of loneliness and friendship.

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Monkey Town by Ronald Kidd
250 Pages

The year was 1925 and Tennessee had passed the Butler Act making it illegal to teach evolution in Tennessee public schools. And so began the infamous Scopes Trials in which an assuming teacher was destined to make history in what all began as a publicity stunt to promote the small town of Dayton, Tennessee. Seen through the eyes of 15 year old Frances, this story examines black and white, right and wrong, and shades of gray as a young girl tries to understand who's "right" and who's "wrong" in this historical (though fictional) account of justice and injustice. This engaging and well-written story offers an intriguing vantage point regarding issues which still divide over eighty years later.

Sue Fitzgerald said...

I too read Monkey Town and enjoyed it.
Mrs. Fitz

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Notes from the Midnight Driver by Jordan Sonnenblick
265 Pages

I must admit that I was reluctant to start this title because of the unusual book jacket illustration featuring a gnome seemingly driving a car. But, after I got past the unlikely cover, I thoroughly enjoyed the story of a fairly normal teenager named Alex Gregory as he attempted to deal with his parents' divorce. Unfortunately, in the process, Alex made a very bad decision to drink and drive. While no one was hurt, Alex was forced to do community service. Through his experiences, we see Alex develop from a self-centered teen into an insightful young adult with new perspectives on the complexities of life. Despite the seriousness of the subject matter, the tone of the book remains upbeat and humorous throughout. --A great summer read!!!

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
The Christopher Killer by Alane Ferguson
274 Pages

Not the feel good novel of the year, The Christopher Killer uses CSI type investigation and details as high school senior Cameryn Mahoney works with her father and county coroner to uncover the identity of a serial killer. This story will keep you guessing until the very end. Who is the killer? The new deputy? The outcast high school student? The famous psychic with unusually specific details regarding the case? Cammie must find the answer before she becomes the next victim.

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Hit the Road by Caroline B. Cooney
183 Pages

Honestly, I was not particularly intrigued by the plot description on the cover of Hit the Road. A teenage girl drives her grandmother and her three friends to their 65th college reunion. Boy was I wrong! First of all, these ladies have quite an adventure on their road trip. Secondly, the characters are so endearing and authentic. (My grandmother wore Youth Dew perfume, too!) And finally, the deep, lasting friendships between "the girls" gives young Brit (the teenage granddaughter) and readers alike a poignant reminder of the lasting bonds of true friendship. Girls, this one's for you!

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
The Rules of Survival by Nancy Werlin
259 Pages

The Rules of Survival is heart wrenching and intense yet still hopeful. A now 18 year old Matthew writes a letter to his 9 year old sister about their horrific and terrifying childhood revealing to readers a diary-like account of constant abuse from an evil mother giving this fictional account a very real feel. The power of the writing left me wondering about the author's own childhood, but little about her own story is revealed beyond her other titles and education. Even her website, http://www.nancywerlin.com, offers readers little insight into the personal life of the author.

If you like The Rules of Survival, try The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls--an autobiographical account of abuse and neglect told from the child's perspective. It will change your life.

Mrs. Moore said...

I've been enjoying a summer of reading. I finally bought a copy of Twilight, started the book that Sunday afternoon, read until after midnight, and finished the next day. I could not put the book down. I then stopped by the Dorman media center to get copies of New Moon and Eclipse--the copies were not in, so I went to Barnes and Noble and bought them. Let's just say that by Thursday afternoon I had completed all three and was trying to figure out what to read between then and August 2. I was told that I wouldn't be able to put the books down, and I couldn't. Since that week, I've found other books to occupy my time: 19 Minutes--a must read for all high school teachers, and really all teachers and parents; The Last Lecture; a re-read of The Lords of Discipline; The Host--a different offering from Stephanie Meyer; Inexcusable--a good read for young men and parents of young men; so many others that I can't remember them all right now--but not to worry, I do have them all listed and the number of pages I've read. The Barnes and Noble party for the release of Breaking Dawn is August 1, at 10:00 PM, and I dare say many Cavaliers will be in attendance. I think our return to school will be an Edward/Jacob debate with lots of impromptu book talks and discussions about the upcoming movie. Keep reading, Cavaliers, and log those page numbers.

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Life as We Knew It by Susan Pfeffer
337 Pages

Warning: Life as We Knew It is NOT for the anxiety prone! I seriously went to the grocery store and stocked up on some essentials while reading this book. I had to stay up until 3 AM this morning to finish it so that I can move beyond this story filled with over 300 pages of gloom and doom with a few, tiny hints of hope sprinkled here and there. Basically, an asteroid hits the moon causing it to come closer to the earth resulting in total climate change, devastating natural disasters throughout the world, and the threat of the extinction of the human race. We read from the diary of Miranda, a typical high school student, who with her family tries to survive in these desperate times. After the asteroid hits, it all starts with gas prices hitting $10/ gallon, and its downhill from there. I don't know about you, but this hits a little too close to home for me about now. So, if you like to think deeply about the end of life as we know it, this is the book for you.

Sue Fitzgerald said...

Firestorm
David Klass
289 p.

Jack’s life wasn’t real. This rapidly moving eco-science fiction story begins with a typical young man on a date who quickly finds himself the “beacon of hope” for the world. This book is filled with action, environmental issues, good against evil, a beautiful heroin, and life and death issues. I highly recommend this to those who love fast paced science fiction books.

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
The Warrior Heir by Cinda Chima
426 Pages

Have you ever thought that perhaps a world exists beyond the world that we see everyday on the surface? As sixteen-year-old Jack is about to discover, things are very different than they appear in the calm, every-town-USA of Trinity, Ohio. Behind the normal facade, Jack discovers a world of wizards, warriors and enchantresses and finds himself in the middle of the battle of his life. If the possibility of the supernatural inspires you, The Warrior Heir will leave you wanting more of the same. Could a sequel be next?

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Doppelganger by David Stahler Jr.
258 Pages

Doppelgangers are alien-looking creatures, driven to kill human beings and then take on the physical characteristics of that person--aka shape-shifters. This is the story of one young Doppelganger who despite this nature-driven desire truly wants to change. He bonds with his victim's family and discovers the inhumanity of humans while also discovering love.

In his own words, "That's the thing about life that I just don't get. It'll go to hell pretty fast--sometimes all it takes is one little thing, and all of a sudden everything's falling apart. But then the opposite is true, too. Just when you think there's no point in even trying, you find out you're not so bad off after all." p. 215

This one has it all--great plot, character development and intriguing themes. I highly recommend this one for a compelling read from beginning to end.

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Firestorm by David Klass
289 Pages

As Mrs. Fitz wrote, Firestorm is an action-packed, regular guy (Jack) turned super-hero story about saving the world. At the heart of the story is a message about the ecological devastation we are wreaking on the earth. The story talks about a Turning Point when the earth can no longer be repaired. Despite the heavy subject, the book still offers hope that it is not too late and we can make a difference. As part one of The Caretaker Trilogy, Jack's story doesn't end here...

Mrs. Layne said...

Mrs. Layne
Sold by Patricia McCormick
263 Pages

Though a fictional story of a 13 year-old girl sold into a prostitution ring in India, the author notes that she actually went to Nepal and India where the story takes place and spoke with survivors and relief workers trying to save these children from this inhumane treatment. Though not a biographical account of one girl's story, the story of Lakshmi could be the story of any one of these girl's cast into this life of hopelessness and shame. Still, for Lakshmi, despite her desperate situation, hope remains. A heart-wrenching story of the inhumanity of humanity, readers will admire the courage of survivor's of this torture while considering ways to make a difference. Young women especially may want to read this account and consider gender roles in other cultures. This book will leave readers wanting to do something, make a difference, save these girls!

banksle said...

Mrs. Lesa Banks
Deep in the Heart by Gilbert Morris
391 pages
This is the first book in the Lonestart Legacy series. I don't usually read "westerns", but this one held my attention. It is the story of a woman who has been deserted by her husband and moves her family to the Texas area right before the battle of the Alamo. I learned a lot about the fight between the Mexicans and the Texans and some very interesting things about the personality of Santa Anna. I liked it enough to start the second in the series.

Sue Fitzgerald said...

Sue Fitzgerald
New Moon by Stephanie Meyer
563 p.

The Twilight story between Bella Swan and Edward Cullen continues in New Moon. Their unusual relationship takes a turn when Bella is injured at her 18th birthday party given by Edward’s vampire family. With blood running down Bella’s arm the Cullen family can barely resist the temptation of her sweet blood. The Cullen’s quickly decide to move plunging Bella into a deep depression. She finds some solitude in her new friend Jacob as they welcome wild and dare devilish adventures. Edward leaves, Jacob becomes Bella’s best friend, Victoria returns for revenge, Bella meets the Volturi vampires in Italy, and much more will be revealed if you read the second book in the Twilight series.

Sue Fitzgerald said...

Sue Fitzgerald
Nineteen Minutes by Jodi Picoult
778 p.

Have you ever thought about what can happen in nineteen minutes? Josie begins a typical day at school and within nineteen minutes Peter, a school acquaintance, has killed 9 students, 1 teacher, and has left Josie as the surviving witness. This is a captivating story about a small New Hampshire town that is quickly forced to look at many issues of our society. The book candidly discusses bullying, alienated students, weapons in high schools, parents versus young adult issues, and more. This was a chilling novel by Picoult that teachers and adults should read.

Audrey Nay said...

I am really impressed by the amount of reading that is being done. I am inspired to "make" some time to read more. I often find that I get too attached to my computer!!!
I hope to use many of your entries as examples to my senior primary students. I plan to start a similar blog with them by term 2.
Cheers :-) Audrey Nay