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Wednesday, March 14, 2007

Good Books

Has anyone read any good books lately?

212 comments:

1 – 200 of 212   Newer›   Newest»
Beth Thomas said...

I just finished reading "Fake ID" by Walter Sorrells. GREAT book! I started reading it and couldn't put it down!

Dorman Media Center said...

Tell me why you liked the book so much.

Joanne said...

I only read my school books right now.

Mrs. Fitz said...

I just finished Copper Sun by Sharon Draper and loved the book.

Mrs. Hollifield said...

I finished reading Copper Sun over the weekend and it was such a page-turner. I couldn't put it down. I also recently read The Battle of Jericho by the same author (Sharon Draper) and I really enjoyed it. I appreciate the fact that she can tell a great story without using gratuitous language, violence or sexual content.

Ms. Lane said...

I just finished Copper Sun as well. In fact, I read the end of the book in class last night instead of listening to the lecture. Yes! It is that good. But, please do not follow my example :)

Kayla said...

I've really enjoyed reading Copper Sun. It was very inspiring and I hope others will read it.

Erin said...

I haven't read any books lately but there is a series that I love to read over and over. The series is the beloved Harry Potter series. I can't wait for the seventh and final book that comes out this July.

jonathon said...

My favorite series would be the dark elf series by R.A. Salvatore. Salvatore should write more about Drizzt and his adventures against the evils in the world above. I also liked his stories about Artemis and Jarlaxle and the suprise ending in the end of the third book. He is the best writer of all time. He should definitly write more books about Drizzt.

Ms. Loftis said...

I haven't read anything lately but I am planning on reading The Water is Wide by Pat Conroy again over spring break. It was mentioned in an education class I take on Mondays and I realized that I need to reconnect with this wonderful, yet heartbreaking book.

KaylaM said...

i think the book Fake Id it is a awesome book it is good!!!! it is really good!!!!!

Shaggy boy said...

i just finish the book full tilt. The book made me want to read it again and i thought it was a awesome book and i love it

quintenw42 said...

"Fat Kids Rule The World" is a good book it is one of the first good books that I have read in a long time. I recommend this book to anyone, and everyone

Kaneisha R said...

I'm still reading The Secert Life of Bees. So far it is the best book i've ever read. I can't put the book down. I'm so interested to see what happens next.
(The Secert Life of Bees)

DustinG said...

I've been reading the book "Twilight," by Stephenie Myers. It is a great book that is full of suspense. It is hard to put it down.

koolkid26 said...

I have just finished reading "Shattering Glass" the book has to do with the groups in high school.
The popular kids try to make the loser liked by the people in the school which most people like me will not go through in their high school. I recommend this book for a 8 out of 10 for a good read

MichaelEB said...

I have just finished reading "Shattering Glass" and it tells all about how popular people aren't always so perfect. And also how one person can show all of the bad sides of let's say a football player or Mr.popular. It's really a very good book and is worth a pick up.

Chris Eubanks said...

Once you read "Hawksong," you will to want to pick up the next book in the series to find out what happens next.

DarylB said...

I really didn't care for the book "rob and sara.com" because it is really directed toward girls. The novel is structured like e-mails back and forth among characters. Because of this structure the novel felt repetitive and didn't flow well.

adyela said...

I just finished "who am I with out him" and I really love this book because it is has a lot of stories about teenagers. I hope others will read it.

Brian R said...

"The House of the Scorpion"
This is a book that at first I did not think that I would be interested in. Everyone kept telling me that it was a good book but I am not a big reader so I just kind of smiled and nodded to be polite but I was not interested. I picked up the book and could not put it down. It is a really good book. At first I just read it because I had to for my English class but now I find myself reading it on my free time at home. I recommend this book mainly to hispanic readers only because it does have spanish words and many times it does not tell you what they mean so the average person would be lost.

Ellen said...

I just finished "The Night I Disappeared" By: Julie Reece Deaver. Its about a girl named Jamie and shes in love with a boy named Webb they live in Califorina and shes moving to Chicago. She has to live with her mom cause her mom is working on a trial in court. She disappears in her own world.I think this book is really good!!!!I think others should read this book.

johnavon said...

I am currently reading "Prom" I think it is a great book.It is a very realistic and down to earth book. I can relate to some of the situations that happen. Its also somewhat intense because there is a mystery at the start of the novel. I would suggest it to anybody that loves a good laugh too.

Mrs. Moore said...

I also read Copper Sun and thought it was great! I shared the book with my students and many of them are now reading it.

Mrs. Fitz said...

WOW! I'm impressed with the books discussed on the blog.

Kayla said...

I read the book "Kindred". It's a great book. I was surprised of the combination of the genres: African-American Literature and Science Fiction. Time travel into the disturbing period of slavery, which brings up issues that are still on the minds of people today. Read it!

kev6002003 said...

Bronx Masquerade- is a good book, beacause its about poetry and about 12 students. The students spend 1 paragraph each telling about there lives and then they share a poem for Open Mike night. I would reconmmend this book to high school students because they're high school students and it talks about a high schoolers everyday life

jennifer r said...

I am in the middle of reading a book called "All American Girls".This is a really good book and I think that teenage girls should really choose this book to read for fun.It talks about a girl growing up that wants to experience someone else's life. That's how far I have gotten and when I get done I will tell you the rest.

josh said...

The book i have been read is the"Bronx Masquerade" and it is a good book but i just dont like the tone of it. The book talks alot about peoples problems. Everybody dont like to here others problems...

Ashley17 said...

I have read the book "ZigZag" and I feel like it is a really good book from anybody's view. It shows how a road trip can really open your eyes to a lot of different things about yourself and others. And not to mention...the beautiful landscapes all across the United States to see.

mz_seesta said...

I am reading the book called "The Lovely Bones" by Alice Sebold. This is a GREAT book to read. It starts with an interesting beginning and I am looking forward to finishing the book!

Danitza said...

I am reading Dark Angel by David Klass and it's a very interesting book, I'm enjoying it.The author really put in Realness in the way Jeff reacts when in trouble. It shows how normal High School students think at our age.

Katherine said...

"The Lovely Bones" is a strange yet amazing book. I've never read anything like it! I think this book is for everyone because it is about mystery, love, and family.

cool said...

I'm reading a book called Night Hoops by Carl Deuker. So far I think is a great book and I like the characters and the story. I recommend this book to kids the like basketball.It is a boy's book.

marcuseison said...

The book that I have been reading and meditating on is the Battle of
Jerico its about a sixteen year old name Jericho is psyched when he and his cusin and best friend, Josh, are invited to pledge for the Warriors of Distion, the oldest and most exclusive club in school. Just being a pledge wins him the attention of Arielle, one of the hottest girls in school whom he's been too shy even to talk to befor now. This book relate to teens. This is just one of the many books by Sharon M. Draper you also got to cheackout Forged By fire,Tears of a Tiger they are wonderful books.

funnygal said...

Today I finish reading "Prom" by Laurie Anderson. It really is a great book. I didn't want to put it down because you want to know what they were going to do since the math teacher steals the money the school was going to use for prom.
This book does explore some controversial issues so a reader does need to be aware.

Drama Queen said...

I am reading "What Happened to Lani Garver" I think is a good book so far, it is about a person named Lani Garver, in which they don't know if it is a boy or a girl.Lani moves to a new school and meets a friend who has cancer. Then Lani just disappears and nobody knows what happens to Lani.

Quijana said...

I am almost finished with my book''Things Not Seen''so far the book is good the boy is invisible and his parents know but dosn't want other people know about him.

bree loves markey said...

I read a book called Shattering Glass.It grasps your attention from the very begging.Its about a buch of teenage boys in high school who are the major jocks.A new guy transfers and make friends with them,but the group doesnt know his secret he has.

Laurel Porter said...

I'm reading "Twilight" by Stephenie Meyer. It's about a girl who falls in love with a vampire. I like it alot b/c I'm very into books about love. I can't wait to see what happens in the end.

Phoenix said...

This book has captured my attention. Day after day I spend my time reading this book more than watching my usual television. Its very addictive, and you can never look away from it. Once I spot my book around, I pick it up and begin reading. It's one of the best books that I've ever read!

F*F_elbadboy*** said...

The book that I read was "The Safe Keeper's Secret." I think is a good book beacuse it is a story with mystery and the characters go through alot ofexperiences like death,wishes,and dreams.

ryanbret said...

I enjoyed reading "Rob&Sara.com."
It is a wonderful book to read if you like chat rooms! These too people have an realtionship online They ask questions that are relevant and inspiring to readers. It is from month to month they talk about these things. It is sad because they never meet, but it is still a good romantic and passionate book to read.

jose said...

I'm half way through "Shattering Glass" by Gail Giles and I like it so far. It starts off by telling you how the story is going to end. That's the twist that I like because you already know how the story will end, but you want to read it just to find out how it happens. The story is basically about a couple of teenagers who want to make a "nerd" into homecoming king.

Brad said...

For the most part this book is not a bad book. If you would be interested in knowing what it was like for young boys during World War Two this book would be a good one to read. There was some parts of the book I disagreed with though. In parts of this book it talked about a young German boy that wants to be involved in the war and he believes everything that Hitler does is great, and that Hitler is doing what is best for Germany. Its not exactly what i think is true but its a book i would reccomend.

DHS_08 said...

As I started to read the "first part last," it started to disinterest me. As I got in the middle of the book it started to interest me when the young man started to grow more mature about raising his young daughter, Feather. Feather's mama was paralyzed from having birth problems and it made me want to know what happened in the end of the book. "The first part last" is very realistic, welcome to the real world type of book, where it shows you that anything can happen and you have to take what you have and make the best of it. This is an excellent book and it will keep you on your toes wishing to read more.

mgwallace said...

I read the book 1984 for our independent reading project in Mrs. Lane’s class. I enjoyed the book because it was so different from what I had read before. If you have not read the book it is about a man living in a totalitarian government that does not want to be apart of the norm, but to be an individual. I think I really enjoyed it because I did alot of research behind the book and how Orwell thought that that's how our society would end up in 1984. It is very interesting how he used his symbols and his characters to betray the message that he was trying to get people to understand. I wasn't a big fan of the ending, but I guess that is because it didn't turn out how I wanted it too. It is a great book and I strongly suggest reading it to anyone who is on the lookout for a book to read.

Also a great book for young teens that are girls to read is Royally Jacked. There is a series of books like it, but they are all different with different authors. I have read most of them and they are all really good, but I am a fan of this one. It is hilarious and I STRONGLY suggest it if you are looking for a great book to read over Springbreak!! :]]

kirbster2008 said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
StevenGlenn said...

i recently finished Empire by Orson Scott Card, definitely my favorite author

kirbster2008 said...

I read The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn for an outside reading project and it was a fun read. The language and dialect was interesting to read and you could actually picture how they looked and dressed by the way they spoke and the dialect they were given by Mark Twain. The vocabulary wasn't to bad as far as hard to get through the language. Huck Finn is a good classic book...end of story.
signed: kirby tate

Deidre said...

I read Anthem by Ayn Rand for an outside reading project. I really enjoyed the book. It is a very fast read. It takes place in the future when the word "I" no longer exists. Everything is done as a group. The main character discovers himself by rebelling against the rules.

williamskelton said...

I have just completed "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury. This novel really had a profound impact on my life as a person.

Olive said...

i just finished the novel "Lay That Thumpet it our Hands," by Susan Carol McCarthy. It was GREAT. I has never read a book that was so spiritual and heartwarming at the same time.

Kleve Granger said...

I just completed The Old Man and the Sea. This novella, published by Ernest Hemingway, depicts the the struggle of man deying immense diversity. This novel is about a 45 min. read, and I highly recommend it. (if skelton reads this, I enjoyed your comment)

Ms. E. Smith said...

Hi happy bloggers! I'm currently reading Dreams from my Father by Barack Obama. It's a really interesting read. The book tells of Obama's desperate search for self as a son of an African father and a white Mid-western mother. I'm reading about his rise in the political world, from a young man who does not know what he believes to a focused politician who wants to change the world. I'm normally not much for memoirs and biographies, but I can't seem to put this book down.

Ms. Loftis said...

Oh, Ms. Smith, you just reminded me about Barack Obama's book Dreams From My Father. I read it over Christmas break and I also thought is was terrific. His life is fascinating!

SejalN said...

I have read The Lottery Rose by Irene Hunt, and it is a wonderful book that will bring tears to your eyes. It is about a young boy who goes through many hardships in his childhood, and his only hope and friend is the rose he has won. I could not put this book down, and was extremely surprised at the unexpecting ending.

Tiffany Alley said...

I'm read a fantastic book, well, last summer, actually, but I'm reading it again for the third time right now. Anyway, it's "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak, a great new YA author (he wrote "I Am The Messenger" too, also a wonderful book). Narrated by Death, it's the amazing story of a girl growing up in Nazi Germany, and how she uses the power of words to change the lives of her friends, neighbors, and the Jewish man hiding in her foster parent's basement. Yes, it is another WWII book, but don't let that scare you off; this book has the power to change your life. Zusak is an amazing writer, at once both remarkably poetic and rugged. I definitely suggest anyone wanting to read a great book check out "The Book Thief." And, just a friendly warning, be prepared to cry at the end.

itz_KG said...

I am currently reading a novel by Susane Colasanti called, When It Happens.
I'm only about halfway into the book and I can already tell that it is going to be
one of my favorites. Its so interesting and hard to put down because the novel
includes so many different situations that teenagers go through, such as, crushes,
boyfriends/girlfriends, school, family, and friends.
The main character, Sara, wants two things, to get into a top college and to find
true love. While Sara has a huge crush on a popular jock that soon starts to notice
her and invite her places, Tobey, who is big into Battle of the Bands, wants nothing
more but for Sara to fall in love with him. As Sara spends more and more time with
the jock, Dave,tension comes between her and her friends.
Where I last left off, Tobey has gotten one of Sara's friends to hook him up with her
and find out if she is interested in him.
Yes; it may sound like the typical teenage love storyline, but I, personally, think its
amazing :) Definitely a girls book, but it is a great novel.

LanieH said...

I recently finished reading The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen. It was directed more towards girls but it had my attention the whole time. It is the story about a girl, who struggles because of her father's death. She doesn't want to participate or do anything anymore because her dad isnt there. She meets new friends and they inspire her to keep living life.

clay smith said...

I read the book "The Things They Carried" and it was good. I would suggest that everyone should read this.

Ms. Lane said...

Skelton,

I would like to know what "profound impact" Farhenheit 451 had on your life as a person. Perhaps, I need to re-read that book?

Mrs. Moore said...

Over spring break I read several books, but the one I highly recommend is The Pact. The Pact is the true story of three young men from Newark, New Jersey who make a pact to become doctors. We see the journey of these young men as they overcome obstacles of the inner city to fulfill their dreams. The journey is not always easy, and the young men make mistakes along the way, but they are willing to stick together and to work hard to make their dreams reality. The book is inspirational and teaches the power of a dream and the power of friendship.

i'mjoshZ said...

I read 1984 by George Orwell. It changed my life. I wake up with a new look on life. But seriously though I really enjoyed the novel and I loved Orwell's thoughts of totalitarian(might be misspelled)government and I think that anyone who has an interest in science fiction should pick it up and read it.

Alex Cherry said...

Before Spring Break I checked out this amazing book called New Moon by Stephenie Meyer. It's the second in a series, the first being Twilight. I couldn't put it down for a minute! I've seen a lot of friends reading the book as well- and they all loved it just as much as I did. If you're into the whole fictional-supernatural-romance thing (like me :])...then I'm sure you'll love Meyer's series too!

I do warn the guys- it's a chick book. :]

Alex Cherry said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alex Cherry said...

There's another book out there also entitled The Pact by Jodi Picoult. I have not actually read the book, but it has been reccommended to me several times. It's about two close families and how their children end up dating in high school. Out of the blue, however, a secret pact between the couple leads to the death of the girlfriend. The Pact has the possibility of being more depressing than enjoyable, but I'm planning on picking this one up a.s.a.p. anyways. When I'm done- I will pass on my review. :]

Jordan rutherfrord said...

I just finished reading Clive Cussler's latest work, "Treasure of khan". Cussler's books make me think about the challenges that face societies around the world. In "Treasure of Khan", Cussler writes about the high demand of oil and how far a company will go to come out on top of the market. I would suggest this book to anyone who like historical mysteries and adventure novels.

GoCocks said...

I did 1984 for my outside reading project. I enjoyed most aspects of the book. I especially agreed with the rebellion againstinjust authority and Winston's unwillingness to abandon his beliefs no matter the circumstances. I just wish the book could have been written without the dark and depressing atmosphere. All things considered, however, it was a good book.

Harrison Tiller said...

I read "Even Now" by Karen Kingsbury and absolutely loved it! It was so real, it was like the characters in the book were my friends. I definitely recommend any of Kingsbury's books as well.

Samantha W. said...

I'm reading "A Million Little Pieces" right now by James Frey. It is truly a great book. Aside from the invective language and very gory descriptive scenes it portrays a great message. To live free and just live and not worry about anything else. It's a great book that has inspired me. The core "theme", if you will, is great. Frey's style of writing is very unique and different, it almost reads like a movie script. But all in all its a wonderful book and a great read!

Jenna Y. said...

I recently read The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan. It was about the differences between cultures that cause problems between mothers and daughters. I enjoyed reading it and I recomend it.

sarah brown said...

hey!

i recently read "I Am the Messenger", by Markus Zusak. its about this taxi cab driver, and how he sees a man rob a bank. soon he starts to get playing cards in the mail, giving him adresses of people he is assigned to go visit, and ultimitaly, change their lives. whether by a good deed or by threatening their lives. at the end of the book, he finally finds out who has been giving him these cards in the mail, which turns out to be quite ironic. the main i dea was how a simple man could, in fact, turn out to be someone brave and worth something. I loved it! probably one of the best books ive read this year.

Ashley Adkins said...

I'm currently reading Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jarod Diamond. Its a great book for history buffs like me because it takes a fresh approach to human history. It answers the question "Why did certain groups flourish while others struggled?" He comes from the perspective of a biologist so its a little different from other human history books. I highly recommend it! Ask your history teachers for some extra credit for reading this book!

smurfett said...

I read "Who am I without Him" as well and yes that book is off the chain it is very good book its a book with short stories about teen problems things that really go on with teens its a nonviolence noncursing and nonsexual book.If you like books that gives you the erg to not wanna put it down you should read it.

SamN. said...

A couple of weeks ago I finsished reading the Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingslover. I thought that the book was great! It was about a family, who moved to Africa to help out as missionaries. The book basically tells the struggles of the four daughters and the mother who were forced to go there by their abusive, anti-feminist, traditional father. Also, the family gets stranded in Africa, because all other missionaries leave the congo and the dad refuses to leave until all the Africans accept Jesus. This leads into all the struggles, losses and gains. The book does have it's slow moments, but all of that gets overlooked by the great plots and details. I personally think that the book would make a box-office hit as a movie!

Adam Stovall said...

I just completed The Swiss Family Robinson, for about the twentieth time. I really enjoy this novel because Weiss portrays great action scenes without using overly simplistic language, which gives the novel an intellectual style and still allows it to be an enjoyable read.

Miss Caston said...

English teachers and bibliophiles may be interested in Nick Gekoski's Nabakov's Butterfly in which he shares stories about his encounters with authors--Salman Rushdie, Ted Hughes, Graham Greene, J.D. Salinger and others-- and rare editions of their books or collections of their work. It's intriguing and amusing.

tyler r said...

I've read The Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver. It is a very good book. It's about a girl name Taylor who starts being independent and starts her own life until she gets stuck with a an abundant child on the way. Then later on in the book Taylor finds out that the child has been abused. This book is heart warming and funny. I really enjoyed it.

Matt Brown said...

I read The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien. It is a war novel that is packed with action. I really liked it because it had intense imagery. Also it showed the importance of teamwork and other such characteristics.

Danny said...

I also read The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien.
The book just opened my life up since the war is going on now. The book is a wonderful book and lets the readers experience what these men and women experience in war. The book is very detailed about the war. When I read the book, all I could think about was what these people in the war are doing for everyone in the United States so we have our freedom,and peace.
I recommend this book, if you do not mind the violence, and blood.

KENON said...

I have just finished reading the book "Atlantis Reprise" a book out of the ongoing series "DEATH LANDS" by James Axler. "Atlantis Reprise was a good book. The basis of the series of the books is the planet EARTH after the nuclear wars. In the books they have cannibals, mutants, and humans. The main character of the book is Ryan Cawdor, he is the leader of a group of post-apocalypse survivalists. In this book Ryan and his group of bandits run into the rebals of Atlantis. Ryan and his group hook up with the bandits to help over through the community of Atlantis. I will stop here so I don't ruin the book for anyone who wants to read it. The book has some language and a few crude scenes in it. IF you like fantasy and action you will love the series "DEATH LANDS" by JAMES AXLER.

Dylan C. said...

I just finished reading "Traitor" and "Payback" (the sequel to Traitor) by Andy McNab and really enjoyed reading both of them. I liked the books because the author ties mystery, action, and adventure all together. Although the books are mainly aimed towards guys, i believe girls would enjoy reading them as well. I would definetely recommend these books to anyone looking for a fun read.

Chelsea B. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Chelsea B. said...

I read the book the 'Bean Trees'. It is a great story that demonstrates how hope is an important quality to have in life. Taylor, the main character, drives to where ever she can get too and starts a new life with practically nothing. While starting her new life she is faced with a new responsibility of a child. She names her "Turtle" and they both grow their learning experiences of starting a new life together. It was a great book and really easy to connect to.

Marc A said...

I recently read "Slaughterhouse-Five" by Kurt Vonnegut. Great book. Written with biting sarcasm and stinging humor, the book is a quick, easy read. Despite its almost informal writing style, the anti-war theme throughout the book could not be a more serious subject for Vonnegut, a war vetran himself, to discss. I recomend it to anyone looking for an easy read with a deeper meaning. It is one of my favorite books I've read.

NOTE: I would have written about my favorite book "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card, but I doubt my teacher Mrs. Lane would have deemed that a "work of literary merit". I don't care what she says. Orson could take down her beloved Zora Neale Hurston any day.

kellye said...

I read a bood called the Outsiders. It is a wonderful story about a couple of boys who struggle to live in there dangerous neighborhood. They have alot of obsticles but they get through them. I think that everybody should read this amazing story.

staryrains said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Alex Cherry said...

Last night I finished this amazing book that Mrs. Loftis suggested and let me borrow- Cooper Sun by Sharon Draper. It's been mentioned several times on here already, but I felt I should talk it up as well. The story is about a young African girl named Amari and her struggles of learning to deal with the harsh reality of slave life. Even after she's lost everything, she continues to be strong and follow her only remaining dreams. The 300-page book is a great read, fast and easy. It's a definite page-turner. :]

courtney said...

Okay...I finished reading "Their Eyes Were Watching God,"by Zora Neale Hurtson.At first I could'nt get into it, but after the first couple of chapters, I started to like it. It's about a woman who leaves her town for an extended amount of time and then makes an unexpected return. The people in the town like to speculate about where she's been and what happened to her husband. I really like the plot of the story. I also like the dialect. It's a southern sort of language...something I haven't seen used in books that I have read often. The ending of this book was not what I expected, which made it all the more interesting.

FreddyD said...

Personally, I agree with Marc completely (surprise).
Ender's game is not only a well written, captivating book, but it also does an impressive job depicting the psychology of the human mind, especially under stressful situations, to the point where it is suggested by the Marine Corps University as supplementary reading on leadership psychology (http://www.mcu.usmc.mil/reading/
modules.php?name=Reading_List&op=
content&bookID=49).
Also, in case that's not enough to earn the extra credit, I read 1984. I found the book to be interesting and of course, a well written warning about the dangers of totalitarianism. While the situation in the novel may be a somewhat implausible, it was nonetheless a good method of revealing the theme in the novel and created some interesting plot situations.

Dmooresays said...

I was perusing the local blogspots when my spidey senses started tingling. I heard mention of one of the greatest books of all time, Ender's Game . I found the plot of Ender's Game absolutely gripping. For those of you who are looking for a great read without having to trudge through dialect like Hurston's "'m watchin' Gawd Tea Cake" or Draper's "Dang homey, when you gonna get a new paint job on that raggedy red car o' yo's (this quote is taken from Tears of a Tiger)," then try Ender's Game .

SAGAR said...

I recently read Their Eyes Were Watching God. Though the novel has many elements of literature, I felt the plot had a lot to be desired. The surmise of Tea Cake was a cheesy and cliched ending, and Janie's development as a character was poorly constructed. For avid readers that decide to read this book, look elsewhere. Ender's Game, Slaughterhouse Five, The Old Man and the Sea, and Invisible Man provide impressive substitutions.

Dev6162 said...

I resently finished the book Eragon by Christopher Paolini. It was a steller novella about a boy who finds a dragon egg. There was resently a movie produced from the book whick means the book was good.
~Deven Foltz

Todd The Rod said...

I've had a few books i've read recently:

The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger, is a excellent piece of literature about a boy who just doesn't quite fit in. Holden Caulfield, one of the most beloved characters in American literature, spends two days in the city of New York City. Holden is a very developed character. Its a shame Salinger is by no means a prolific writer. If he was, he could probably be one of the most memorable writers America has ever had.

Chuck's Palahniuk's Haunted is a gruesome tale of a dozen or so men and women trapped in a writer's retreat. The writer of Fight Club tells tale after tale of people who, despite leading very different lives, converge together to try and complete their dream. This novel is extremely nasty and not for the easy stomach, however. I would go into more detail, but my post would probably get deleted.

Their Eyes Were Watching God is the most overrated piece of literature I have ever read. After 30 pages, I could barely continue. Though the dialect is done well, it tells a very pedestrian tale of Janie Crawford, who is a very unexciting character who jumps from husband to husband. The novel has no sense of time, yet it takes longer to read than any book I have ever read. The only positive was Tea Cake, one of the most annoying characters I have ever seen, gets shot at the end.

Ender's Game is the magnum opus of Orson Scott Card. A cornerstone of American Science Fiction, The graceful writing of the journey of Ender Wiggin is hands down an amazing book. Orson Scott Card deserves the Nobel Prize just as much as, say, Orhan Pamuk or Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Dmooresays said...

Also, for those of you who have recently read Ender's Game and crave a new fix, be sure to check out Ender's Shadow. Told from the perspective of Bean, the phantasmagoric world of Ender's Game is unleashed. Fellow readers, good night, and good luck.

jc said...
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ronnie f said...

Their Eyes Were Watching God was a pertty terrible book, kind of like the book Of Mice and Men. The parts that were good were when Tea Cake died and when Lenny died. On the other hand, despite the fact that I have never read the book, Ender's Game is amazing.

Will said...
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Will said...

I have recently finished reading Song of Solomon, by the Nobel Prize- and Pulitzer Prize-winning author, Toni Morrison. In the words of a contributor to the New Yorker:
"A rhapsodic work...intricate and inventive...it billows!"

I wish I could say I could feel the billowing of my heart whilst I turned every gripping page. But I can't.

On this account I must choose to disagree with Mr. Eustace Tilley (along with Miss Winfrey, who has also recommended the novel to her viewers, and a host of others) and their glowing recommendations of a mediocre book. It is times like these that makes me question the judgement of some so-called brilliant Sweeds.

I'm sure the problem is that I was looking to read something on the surface level, and on the surface level Song of Solomon is not interesting in the least. It took me over a month to read because I constantly dreaded touching the piece of filth. However, it eventually became a battle between Toni and Me, and I won. I finished every page.

This could be partly due to my dashing good looks, especially in comparison to Miss Morrison.

On a positive note, Song of Solomon, shares a common characteristic with a work with the most true literary merit of all time, Ender's Game, that is, they both are books. Where Song of Solomon is rambling and pointless, Orson Scott Card's Ender's Game is inspired, inventive, and insightful. In the more-agreeable words of Mr. Thomas M. Wagner, "if the book has any message to deliver about war, it does so through the time-honored tradition of fine storytelling, and it's this: It's no game."

logan m said...
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davisk said...

I have recently been reading the book by Nicholas Sparks, called: Dear John. I have not completed it yet, but so far I love how Sparks shows how war can change people. He presents the dilemma how after September 11th, even though John wanted to do nothing more but come home to see Savannah, he had to choose between his country and love. This can be a very difficult decision for someone who is in love with someone they can't see for 2 and a half years because of the war. Basically I'm saying - this is a great book!! READ IT!!

chan_chan said...

Over Spring Break I finally finished Steven King's, IT.

The detail in which Steven King writes is mainly what kept me interested. The book is a bit of a slow read, but right when I thought I'd lost interest, the book sucked me right back in.

The books centers around 7 children who discover they're all being haunted by a killer clown named Pennywise, who thrives off the lives of children in Derry, Maine. They band together in the summer of 1958 and believe that they have killed Pennywise, only to discover that 27 years later, they must all return to thier hometown to deal with Pennywise yet again.

If anyone decides to read this book, let me know what you think of the ending? Thanks.

Miss Caston said...

Will, if you are looking for an enjoyable "surface read" then DO NOT read Sophie's World right now. Save it for when you are in a philosophical mood--LOL. Have you ventured into the world of Ignatius J. Riley yet? Your heart may just billow yet!

Adam Stovall said...
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Adam Stovall said...

Miss Caston, I believe that it would be difficult to create any effect, billowing or otherwise, by delving into the world of J. Riley. If one is looking for a good read, philisophical or surface level, steer away from Riley. Riley's use of overly sophomoric plots causes him to use flowery language and also to fill the book with exestential and unnecessarily base detail to try and create a plilosphic aire in an effort to draw the reader away from the base, and somewhat decptively simplistic and boaring story line.

kirbster2008 said...
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Ms. Gardner said...

I can't believe any educated student, who can read and has at least half a heart would think that the only good parts about Their Eyes Were Watching God and Of Mice and Men are the parts when the characters die in the end. Are you kidding me? I feel like our society is so numb to violence and injustice that we are not affected by it when we read it in literature. I am not going to knock Enders Game because I haven't read it, however, I would advise students to realize that teachers don't have students read the books that they do just to torture them- there is a lesson to be learned in each novel selection. Life is not all about being entertained, sometimes actual thinking is required.

Lindsay said...

Just finished Jane Austen's novel Emma - Great Book and recommend reading the story if you are into classic tales of love and matchmaking gone ascew with tones of irony thrown into the mix.

Miss Caston said...

Yes, Adam, Reilly is sophomoric, but that is part of the reason why he is HILARIOUS. Do you object to Kennedy's writing style or his potrayal of Reilly? Did you really not find the novel humorous? I laugh out loud when I read this book.

M. Dunn said...

When I heard last year that our science dept. was maybe going to offer a course in pathology, I thought how unfair that I would be gone and not able to sit in on it. I love mysteries and so , while so many readers have mentioned and reminded me of so many great reading possibilities, I must share information about the Elizabeth George series of murder mysteries with Detective Inspector Tommy Lynley and Constable Barabra Havers. The most incredible thing about fine writers is that once you get used to reading Dickens and George and Jan Karon and Mark Twain and Tolkien and so many others, you simply cannot stay awake trying to read mediocre authors. Reading all the great reports of Copper Sun, I can't wait to finish my current Elizabeth George work and begin reading Ms. Draper's Copper Sun which I picked up today at Barnes and Noble.

Miss Caston said...

We English teachers certainly are not naive enough to think that our students will always like the same books or other pieces of literature that we do, and we certainly don't always teach our favorites because of curriculum requirements, etc. Some of you are making insightful, informed, intelligent comments, but let's refrain from simply trashing selections of literature or particular authors. If you give logical objections to particular books, your audience will be more likely to consider your ideas. Of course, this entire enterprise is SUBJECTIVE.

Blindly recommending a book that your friends or peers revere is a perfect example of logical fallacy, which is appropriate at this point in the semester when many of you are writing argument papers. I hope that students will avoid such lapses in reasoning in their essays.

Yes, the dialect in Hurston's novel can be tiresome and students find it difficult to understand initially, but the author is authentically capturing the speech of her characters--even if it is pedestrian. So maybe we all can't relate to Janie's struggle to find her own voice and identity in an oppressive environment. I'm sure none of us have had to live under such conditions and do not understand the effects of such constraints. It is clear that some of you found your voices long ago!

I know that you're having fun, and I certainly encourage responses on this blog. I am not out to censor you--that's impossible. I just want to encourage you be thoughtful in your blog postings and be critical in a productive way.

Former students of mine to whom my entire blog is addressed, watch the grammar and mechanics, please. I know you know better. Stay classy, Dorman. :-)

kirby said...

It has been brought to my attention that this blogspot is being used to trash Their Eyes Were Watching God that is of so-called "literary merit" but of course that is in accordance to the OPINION of the english teachers here at DHS. So I decided to expression my opinion concerning the book--that unforunately i was forced to read.

Unlike some of the other well-educated, well-respected-by-their-peers students that have, if i do say so myself, totally massacred the book thoroughly enough, i have not read the novel Ender's Game. Therefore i will not belittle myself by comparing Their Eyes Were Watching God with a novel that i have not read. However i have read the classic: Green Eggs and Ham. Elementary as it may be, this book is by-far more entertaining that the horrific book that i could barely force myself to read. Ms. Gardner and Miss Caston have taken the liberty to purpose that books that are selected for class reading are selected in order to "teach a lesson" or to enlighten you "philosphically". Taking this into consideration i have analyzed the themes, surface plot, symbols, and other devices that we were thought to annotate for and have still found MRS. Hurston's novel wanting in the eyes of a mere second grade "kiddy-book", Green Eggs and Ham. Green Eggs and Ham teaches that you should not trash something until you have tried it. This is a life-altering lesson in that i have observed it twice in this comment: not using Ender's Game as a comparison, and taking my precious, fleeding time to analyze Their Eyes--especially in comparison to the thematic ideas of true-love, natural perfection(bee, horizon), and desire for true freedom found in that collection of bond papers that is called Their Eyes.

Not only did Green Eggs triumph over Their Eyes under the surface but on the surface as well. Their Eyes was very thick in dialect (so-called authentic language) and the plot was extremely slow going and pointless and thats not to mention the EVER APPEALING cliched Ol' Yaller ending. Green Eyes was easy to read--thus enjoyable--and somewhat humorous(not to mention the fantastic artwork). See I did not have to read a very elaborate, intricately and carefully written book to topple Their Eyes, I simply recalled the reading of elementary Green Eggs and Ham.

If you have not read Their Eyes and are planning to, I suggest that you buy two rolls of ducktape and eradicate your house of anything that the school or the state prison would dub a weapon because in order to force yourself to read this book you are going to have to ducktape yourself to a chair and ridding your house of anything that could be used as a weapon is for the sake of well-being as you will desire to end your life rather than continue reading the knock-off brand, semi-romatic story plot of Their Eyes.
I will now read Ender's Game as it will surely be a better use of my time than reading Their Eyes was--but eating crayons or drinking bleach would also be a better use of the time i spend reading Their Eyes.

Clay Smith said...

I have recently read the story "Their Eyes Were Watching God" and it is an interesting read. It is easy to follow and it is an overall good. I even like the black southern dialect.

Miss Caston said...

I recommend using DUCT tape as opposed to ducktape unless, of course, you were intending to point out the merits of such an imaginary object in helping you adhere to your point. Let me ask the Aflac duck what he thinks. This is getting sticky--pun intended.

kirby said...

I just wanted to let everyone know that everything that is being posted is indeed the thoughts of the students that have ACTUALLY read Their Eyes, however, this criticism is all in good nature. It is totally legal to my knowledge to criticize literature. And Miss Caston, Ducktape (R) is actually and name brand of ductape. So if your going to correct someone atleast make sure you know your ductape! haha.....disclaimor: this comment was not checked for grammatical errors. sorry if there are any to all those OCD english teachers reading this.

Miss Caston said...

Yeah, I think they created that brand name because so many people were mistakingly taping their ducks instead of their ducts. :-)

We should stick to what we know, shouldn't we--Dr. Seuss and Hurston included. I'm glad you all survived the Hurston torture and have a forum in which to deal with the effects of being forced to read such tripe. Let's hope you enjoy your next coerced reading more! Sorry, guys, but all the criticism about Their Eyes will not result in its removal from the curriculum.

Why don't we veer this blog back to it's original request to post about books that we WOULD actually recommend to others? What a NOVEL idea!

willskelton said...

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston made me want to kill myself. In fact Dr. Seuss's classic Hop on Pop is a much better read. Hop on Pop contains everything that that dirty piece of filth they call a "novel" does not. Ah might not know how to assemble a computer blindfolded, but I do know that Their Eyes Were Watching God is a bad read, and would never recommend it to anyone unless they wanted to go CRAZY!

willskelton said...

I have just completed "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury. The fact that Montag is in a constant fight for his happiness is something that I can relate to. This is why Bradbury is one of the greatest authors of all time. He can take characters and allow the reader to become one with the character.

Steven Glenn said...
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Steven Glenn said...
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Steven Glenn said...

Their Eyes Were Watching God is not the most invigorating read, for it is quite slow at times, but I believe that the eye dialect (or w/e Ms. Loftis called it...) gave the act of reading this book a little flare. Yep, well i must feed now.

kirby said...
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Mrs. Fitz said...

Kirby,
Well said:)
Mrs. Fitz

jacobm...is supermachofantastic said...

i recently read Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. it is quite possibly the beastliest novel i've ever read. this novel not only explores modern society, but the very nature of the human mind in a society of "men raised by women." if you've seen the movie, read the book...if you haven't seen the movie, read the book...then see the movie.

also, i recently read "survivor type," a short story by stephen king. this tells the story of doctor turned drug trafficker who crashes, alone, an a barren island. the ensueing struggle for survival is very interesting as the only living things there besides himself are a few birds...(he ends up eating his legs so you know its good).

Danny said...

I read Their Eyes Were Watching God, since it was mandatory. The book was ok. It gave WONDERFUL points, and lessons in life that everyone should know, about how to treat females, but it was tiring. I admit I almost fell asleep at times in the beginning, but the book got more exciting as it moved on. I would recommend the book to anyone, because it gives off universal themes that everyone should learn.

kirby said...
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FreddyD said...

Ok-There Eyes Were Watching God is a terrible book; I think we can all agree on that (the students anyway).

Since Dr. Seuss keeps coming up, I would like to compare his epic work "The Lorax" to a poem I recently analyzed in class, "Because I Could not Stop for Death" by Emily Dickenson.

In order to end on a positive note, I'll start with Dickenson's poem. I found the whole personification thing with death typical. It's done way too often, and I don't see anything special there. The concrete metaphor (a carriage) was bland at best. Granted, it may be because I don't ride in a carriage, but the whole "journey through life" thing is just another often-used, cliche metaphor. I honestly don't think any poem with a vehicle being used as a symbol of life's journey deserves any credit for creativity, unless the vehicle is sufficiently awesome (a flying saucer for instance). Another thing, the way "Because I Could not Stop for Death" rhymes, along with its meter, is rather frustrating. Dickenson does not bother to create any sort of flow to her poem, and if she finds it too difficult to create a rhyme between two lines, she simply doesn't worry about it.

"The Lorax" on the other hand is an exemplar piece of literature, with much literary merit in its rhyme, vocabulary, and even its illustrations. Dr. Seuss actually makes an effort to create rhymes, and does so consistently, while unveiling an impressive plot, one that teaches us how important nature is; which leads me to my next point: the theme of "The Lorax." Anyone who has read the poem even once can explain it to you without much effort. Put simply, it is the important lesson that, if we do not take care of our natural resources, we will live to regret it. The beauty of this lesson is that Dr. Seuss teaches it in a very uncomplicated way. He does not have to use the rhetoric of Chief Seattle, or the confusing, pompous language of the Transcendentalists, but rather, a simple metaphor of an environmental activist (the Lorax), fighting to save what he knows is important (the Truffula trees). The genius in "The Lorax" lies in its how easy a read it is. Years from now, will you remember the aloof, complicated vocabulary of Emerson, or the catchy, easy-to-understand words of Dr. Seuss? "The Lorax" gets the same message across to the reader as "Nature" in about a tenth of the time, and without the need for an ibuprofen afterwards.

In the words of Cato the Elder: Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam.

jacobm...is supermachofantastic said...

i just finished blackholes, wormholes and time machines by Jim Al-Khalili. it is a nonfiction book describing theoretical physics and the possibilities and impossibilities of such things as blackholes, wormholes, and time machines. if you are a genius you should read this, otherwise it is way too complex.

Todd The Rod said...

i must agree with Freddy on his point of Emily Dickinson. I think poetry in America would be much more developed if Thomas Higginson and Mabel Todd had never published Dickinson's poetry posthumously. Or if they could've at least had the decency to remove the dashes. However, Orson Scott Card's poetry is that of pure magnificence. Though he stopped writing poetry early in his literary career because he was destined to go make Fyodor Dostoyevsky look like a pathetic writer with his penning of Ender's Game, Card's poetry is a beacon of hope in a sea of disparity. Hopefully Orson Scott Card is also hiding 2000 poems that will published posthumously.



I believe Wilfred Owen would say, "Dulce et Decorum Est"

David Ultimateballer Moore said...

Who is this so called Dickenson? About people mindlessly trashing books, I agree with Kirby, mainly because he is a baller. Well, I'm pretty sure he is an Ultimateballer now, after his analysis of Green Eggs.
Chan, I've started reading It, I'm not sure if you mentioned any spoilers because I shielded my eyes from your post, but if anybody is planning on posting plot they need to add a spoiler alert of some sort.
Looking back on Their Eyes Were Watching God I'm beginning to think that perhaps the student reaction to the novel is a bit overly dramatic. I mean, the dialect wasn't hard to understand, and the plot wasn't actually that bad at times... [Flashback to entire weekend spent bent over Their Eyes Were Watching God equipped with a highlighter] Wait. Nevermind.

Ms. Lane said...

"There are times when the world is rearranging itself, and at times like that, the right words can change the world. ..This is what historians do, quibble about cause and effect when the point is, there are times when the world is in flux and the right voice in the right place can move the world. Thomas Paine and Ben Franklin for instance." Peter Wiggin-Ender's Game

Peter is exactly right. Voices and language and literature can, do, and will change the world. That is the beauty and magic of literature. That is why authors like Zora Neale Hurston and Orson Scott Card speak to people on a level that they are not even aware exists most of the time. That is why there are and will be books that will change the way you view your life, your very nature. Ones that you will never forget and always hold close. Literature affects people. It is a fact. And, as much as I don't want to admit it..because it is my job to teach it..sometimes it is important just to read something without analyzing it. "Suck the very marrow from life" and experience the pure escapism of a novel. It is an even better vehicle than an space ship or a carriage.

For those of you who love "Eyes" try reading "The Color Purple". It is yet another journey through the struggles and triumphs of a powerful woman. We can all learn from powerful women. In fact, every one of us needs to thank the one who is responsible for us even being on this earth.

For those of you who love "Ender's Game" try Nancy Farmer's "The House of the Scorpion". No part of it is set in space, but there are hints of Ender in the main character, and it depicts the same type of world that Ender had to "battle" his way through.

I leave you with one more quote from Peter the great.."The world is always a democracy in times of flux, and the man with the best voice will win. He gets his power from words, but only from the right words at the right time."

Read on my darlings..read on :)

Miss Caston said...

D'accord.

Adam Stovall said...

Mrs. Lane, I agree with you in the sense that books and certain authors can change the world and an individuals view of the world. However, I do not believe that A book by the likes of Hurston can change a person's life on a level that a person does not know exists, for if a person does not know that something exists how can they note a significant change or realization acheived through literature. I also believe that it would be difficult for a reader to be affected by "There Eyes Were Watching God" when they have to wade through chapter after chapter of crushing deep south dialect and overly lenghty chapters filled with exestential details which convey many themes of little merit. Aside from a few points Hurston says little within the book while still making it a crushing and somewhat boring read.

Edward Abbey once said

"Good writing can be defined as having something to say and saying it well. When one has nothing to say, one should remain silent. Silence is always beautiful at such times."

In the case of "There Eyes Were Watching God" it is my firm belief that hurston should have observed the beliefs of Edward Abbey and remained in a state of "beautiful silence" instead of bogging the literary world down with her boring and extremely over rated novel.

i love horses 123 said...

After reading Their Eyes Were Watching God, I came to the realization that Alice Walker is out of her mind for saying "There is no book more important to me than this one." There are many books that deserve higher acclaim than the Hurston "masterpiece," such as Ender's Game, a book which I have yet to read (please bear in mind I am constructing this post under the watchful eyes of "FreddyD")--However, as I realize that I must get extra credit for Ms. Loftis, I will admit that the ending of Their Eyes was rather wonderful!!!

Locke said...

I fully agree with Mrs. Lane. She took the words right out of my mouth.

Ms. Lane said...

Literally..right Locke?

Ms. Loftis said...

I love horses 123,
Please explain why you think the ending of Hurston's book was "rather wonderful." Extra credit requires some explanation :)

Demosthenes said...
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Tiffany Alley said...

Though I personally did not care much for "Their Eyes Were Watching God" (it's not a horrible book, I can understand why some people like it), I do believe it has some good points. Zora Neale Hurston is a wonderful writer--her use imagery and dialect are particularly effective. She creates some beautiful word pictures and some phrases throughout the book. Honestly, the thing I disliked most was the plot; I felt it dragged at points. But I still have respect for Hurston, for her writing style if nothing else.

Marc A said...

Demosthenes and Locke, as much as I admire your passion for literature, you're personas fail to follow the contraints of those created by Peter and Valentine Wiggin in "Ender's Game". Had you been more familiar with the text, you would know that Locke and Demosthenes never, under any circumstances, interact with each other. Good try though.

Demosthenes said...

It was a poor choice on the part of the user with code name "mrs. lane" to quote the character Peter. Here's a quick profile in case you've forgotten a bit about Peter:

(Spoiler Alert)
Peter is a manipulative and cruel character, with a complete lack of compassion, morality, or even humanity. (Here's a good example of indirect characterization: He peels the skin off live squirrels and stakes them into the ground for fun. Don't worry, he only watches them 'til "their life seeps out of them.") His actions are always motivated by selfishness, and his talents are used only to exploit others. Even his brief collaboration with his sister Valentine is in order to secure his own position over all people of Earth. Ender, savior of the entire Earth, cannot even return to Earth because he is afraid of being taken advantage of by his brother. As evidenced by the quote, it is Peter's opinion that the right voice at the right place and time can change the world. And he's right. Look what he does. Evil can serve a (good) purpose, but, in the case of Peter Wiggin, only when it's in its own best interest. In summary, with the exception of incidental or accidental and always calculated benevolence, Peter is evil.

-Demosthenes (Yes, that's right)

As a side note, I wholeheartedly recommend these outstanding reads: Ender's Game and Their Eyes Were Watching God. In fact I think many interesting parallels could be made between these works of equivalent literary merit; for starters try a comparison between Jody Starks and Peter. (I'd argue that despite their similar motivations, Jody started out well-intentioned and ended poorly, and Peter started out bad and turned out better.) That'd make a wonderful essay prompt for those who enjoy Ender's Game and Their Eyes Were Watching God as I do.

Note: Remember that occasionally, via holes in the fabric of the space-time continuum, games can and will be played with the continuity of the universe of fiction, of both the regular and the scientific variety, even within a select group of so-called "passionate" students. (Some passionate students even use the contraction for "you are" instead of the second-person possessive determiner or forget that titles of books are italicized or underlined!)

Also some other students last read certain "texts" back in seventh grade.

Mr. (Miles) Lane said...

Well, since I get to hear all about the DHS Blog every night when my wife gets home I thought I would stop by and add my 2 cents to the discussion.

Since I see that we have some active members with an eye towards the finer, less refined literature genres of Science Fiction, I thought I would suggest a Non-Fiction Science item for the group.

If there is a "classic" non-fiction science book, a strong case could be made for A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking. While contemporary physics topics like M-theory could quickly melt my brain, Hawking has a knack for describing complex concepts in relatively simple terms.

If there ever were a physics book that an English teacher would love and/or understand, I think that it would be Time!

Dusan...did this for xtra credit said...

I good book that I read recently was Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk. It was really an interesting book...Perhaps most interesting was the character transformation between the main character and his close companion Tyler Durden. In the story the more the main character sleeps, the more he becomes like Tyler. Eventually, people begin mistaking them for each other. This book is an engrossing, Chuck Norris-like, actions packed thriller. If you aren't satisfied with this book, you can return it to your library and get a book about flowers...and shame.

David Ultimateballer Moore said...

I agree with Marc. If you are going to try and allude to the scripture, at least do it accurately.

Dusan...did this for xtra credit said...

I like Hurston's Their Eyes Were Wathching God a little bit, but was kind of confused about why she portrayed Janie's husbands as abusive (excluding Tea Cake). Did Hurston do this to make Janie's discovery of Tea Caken seem that much sweeter?

jacob suits said...

The only part i liked about There Eyes was that fact that Janie had the guts to shoot her husband, it showed her strength and ability to be independant

WillB said...

After reading an excerpt from "Fahrenheit 451" last semester and reading the book for a project this semester it really opened me up to the idea of censorship and the real value of books to our modern day society. "Fahrenheit 451" also contains a great deal of action and is an overall exciting book to read which contributed to why I enjoyed reading the book so much.

i love horses 123 said...

This is actually i love horses 123 (kleve), not Clay--I forgot my password, embarrassing as that is. In response to my last post, I believe the ending of Their Eyes Were Watching God was "wonderful" because the death of another main character interrupted the monotony of the last few chapters.

andrew dalton said...

I liked Their Eyes were Watching God becasue Janie was a strong female character in a period when women were looked down upon.

Mrs. G- said...

I finished reading Copper Sun in record time! I checked it out on Thursday and returned it Friday morning. I couldn't put it down- and I'm a math teacher. Yes we do read as well as work with numbers!
If you haven't decided on a summer read yet- you've got to start with this one. You won't be disappointed.

Jordan rutherfrord said...

Thank you mr lane for the suggestion that people should read a brief histury of time. in my opinion, i would recommend Universe in a Nutshell, another hawking book. This book is basically the updated version of a brief history of time but also discusses superstring theory and P-branes (pronunced as pea brains).

SnelgroveS said...

Hey everyone. I read Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury for the graffiti wall in English. It is basically about firemen that burn books and one of the firemen has an awakening that books are important to the world. He then fights to save books that he is told to burn. I really enjoyed every part of this book. It grips the reader and takes them on a literary rollercoaster. It has twist and turns that won't let you stop reading and makes every page turn an exciting experience.

Mrs. Zeiler said...

I highly recommend reading the non-fiction book "Left To Tell" by Immaculee Ilibagiza. This is a personal account of how she, as a young college student, endured the slaughter of her family and friends and months of agonizing hiding during the Rwandan Holocaust of 1994. It is so much more that a narrative of one of the most horrific events of the 20th century. It is about love, faith and forgiveness and the indominable human spirit. Immaculee is a gem! Your life will be changed by her remarkable story!

SejalN said...

I have read Bless me Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya. It is very interesting book, that demonstrates how importan family is in life, and it also shows how one should do what their heart tells them too, not what others say. This novel also gives the reader information about Spanish culture and traditions.

clay smith said...

I have started the book "The Great Gatsby" and so far it is really interesting. I love how he uses so much suspence in the first couple chapters and he shows the problems with families in modern times.

clay smith said...

I am currently reading "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald and so far I am really enjoying it. I love how he relates a family from old times to families in current life.

Todd The Rod said...

If I had to choose anything in the world to read, it would probably be the screenplay to Pulp Fiction. Pulp Fiction, the greatest movie since The Godfather, in reading form? Pure genius. Plus, Tarantino's dialogue is much more stimulating than the talking between Hurston's vapid characters.

Tiffany Alley said...

Though I personally didn't care much for "Their Eyes Were Watching God" (it wasn't a horrible book and I can understand why some people would like it), I do believe it had some good points. The main thing I disliked about the book was the plot, which seemed to drag at points and, as far as I'm concerned, really wasn't that interesting. However, Zora Neale Hurston is a wonderful writer--her use of imagery and symoblism are particularly effective. I really like her style, and, of course, I totally respect the feminist themes in "Their Eyes."

LanieH said...

I thought Their Eyes Were Watching God was written very well. Though it was not my favorite book, i really enjoyed the dialect. It helped create the "southern town" feeling. One thing i think Hurston could have done though is to shorten the plot. It felt like the story kept going on and on.

callie said...

I just read the book "The Five People You Meet in Heaven." It was such a great book. The imagery was fascinating.

Lee said...

Mrs. Moore sucked me into Sharon Draper's work so I decided to leave a comment in favor of the novel Copper Sun. It was very moving. (And I also told Mr. Wyatt that I was excited about Ms. Draper coming to our school next year.... so if you liked the book, you may have a chance to meet her!) Another book that I have recently finished is Gatsby's Girl. It's a novel by Caroline Preston and its based on the the life of a young girl who meets author Scott Fitzgerald. The main character parallels Daisy in the Great Gatsby.(Her best friend plays golf, they go to fine parties, etc.) It's somewhat of a girly book. I don't recommend it for the guys. But I got through it in three days. I couldn't put it down.

Casey said...

I just finish PEEPS by Scott Westerfeld it's a great book that will keep you interesting through out the whole novel and will make you want to finish it

Casey said...

I have gotten finish reading caught in the act by peter moore it's a great book with alot of plot turns and the ending is unexpected it would be a great book to read

Ms. Loftis said...

I will just have to agree with all the bloggers on here who loved Sharon Draper's Copper Sun. I finished the novel myself about two weeks ago and have sinced encouraged two students to read it. I read it in a day - it was fantastic and I couldn't put it down. Since Sharon Draper is coming to our school next year, I certainly encourage students and teachers to read it. Although sad, it is a captivating story of HOPE.

James Louis L said...

I have read one of the best books i have ever seen if your into war book this book called soldier boy its a book about two kids that want to go to the army in this book there are alot of details its a really good detailed book if you like war book make sure to read this book

James Louis L said...

we are read this amazing book called "monster" its a really good book if your into law and order on the t.v then this is a good book we are reading in ms. loftis class well its about a kid that had massed up his life by getting involde with the wrong people and it lead him up to jail and he dont like it there and he said he wants to creat a movie and the book is in movie format witch is really neat cause you can close your eye and see it really happening that so thats a really good book that i am reading!!!!! i love this bloging stuff its cool btw

KellynnP said...

Recently in Mrs. Lane's class, we read Their Eyes Were Watching God. I enjoyed this book even though at times the strong dialect made it a very slow read. The boys in the class hated this book because it was a girl book. Janie's many husbands relates to how society is today. Many people are divorced and remarried. But overall, this book was okay, not my favorite, but it was good for a required book to read in class.

Annette Godbout said...

"Their Eyes Were Watching God," a novel written by Zora Neale Hurston, truly capivates the ignorant racisim and anti-feminist views of that time era. Hurston employs these themes through her main character, Janie, being a strong-willed, beautiful mixed woman. Throughout Janie's life the men she is with mold and shape her character to be the person she is in the end. It is through her trails, heartaches, and struggles that she is made the person that she is. I strongly reccomend this book for anyone who is searching for a book that really captivates the meaning of true love and determination. I enjoyed reading this book because it demonstrates the idea that a woman is capable of doing or becoming anything a man can and people are not inferior because of a race.

Annette Godbout said...

"The SisterHood of the Traveling Pants," by Ann Brashares, is an AMAZING series of books demonstrating the heartaches, trails, and struggles teenagers are faced with growing up. The four main characters; Tibby, Carmen, Lena, and "Bee" are all incredibly unique but yet they are one. Their friendship is an unwavering bond that nothing can pull apart. Throughout the series these girls are faced with death, divorce, and heartaches but they all manage to overcome their struggles by the support and love they find in one another. These books are easy reads, but yet the themes and morals found in them are timeless. I as a reader fell in love with each character and it was hard to put the books down. I would STRONGLY STRONLGY reccomend these series to anyone who is looking for a book they can relate to, fall in love with the characters ofnd cherish forever.
(of all age groups!)

Cierra Harris said...

I just got through reading "Tuck Everlasting."I just couldn't stop there I just had to see the movie. If you are wondering how people feel to live eternally well this book is for you. Once you start reading this book you will want to drink from a spring .

Jenn Emplit said...

I like the book The Bean Trees. I read it for a project and i really enjoyed it. It had a lot of good themes that i learned from

sally said...

My favorite book of all time, and yes, it IS romantic novel, is Just a Summer Romance by Ann M. Martin. It's the kind of girly book that doesn't make you cry and does have a happy ending, unlike my other favorties such as The Notebook.

david said...

My favorite series is "a series of unfortunate events." The author's got some different and surprising humor that's different than most. Like when the narrator was talking about how you should never walk off with strangers. At the bottom of one page, it says, "Now children, i hope that you know that you should never," (turn page) "never, never, never..." And it has a whole page of never - and you just didn't see it coming!

david said...

I though it was interesting at how much detailed foreshadow there was in "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Like at the end of Ch. 2, it says, "And ah can't die easy thinkin' maybe de menfolks white or black is makin' A SPIT CUP outa you..." This foreshadows Jody's treatment towards Janie and is ironic, because they both get a spit cup.

Jenn Emplit said...

I read the book The Bean Trees and I really enjoyed it. My favorite part was the themes, like respect the enviroment and the importance of friends and family in your life and how your friends can become your family. I strongly agree with these themes and they are very important to me because my friends and family are the most important things in my life. Also, I like the nature theme because everyone should respect nature.

kellye said...

I read the book Their eyes were watchig God. It is a very powerful book. It talks about fiminism and a Journey that this girl named Janie has to take. I recommend this book for everyone to read because it is very uplifting i think that everyone would enjoy it.

acevedo said...

I read Fahrenheit 451 for my outside reading in Mrs. Lanes class. It was a good book but was hard to get into. We also read Their Eyes Were Watching God and i think that was a much better book. The dialogue was hard to understand at first but it ended well.

keane said...

The Things They Carried was a great book with lots of themes and morals. I enjoyed reading it and would recommend it to anyone that wants to read a good book. It is sometimes confusing but after the first few chapters it gets easier.

keane said...

Their Eyes Were Watching God is a great book that i really enjoyed. I feel that it really showed the history of the african american culture and their unique ways of life, during that period of time. The themes portrayed in the book illustrate the inter-racial conflicts they had to overcome. I highly recommend it.

Sarah09 said...

Right now I'm in the middle of reading Copper Sun, by Sharon Draper. Mrs. Loftis actually got me into the book when she told us about it in class. I practically have to tear myself away from the book during the day because it is so gripping. The description of the hardships the young girl in the story, Amari, is going through are so realistic that you feel her pain and strife. I certainly wouldn't call this book a chick or guy book. I believe this suits all crowds.

coleman said...

i just read hachet and is a wonderful book. If you like outdoor books you should read this one.

coleman said...

I just read In To The Wild. It is a good book.

Jenna Y. said...

In Their Eyes were Watching God, I enjoyed the diction. It was hard to read at first, but after I read the book moved very quickly.

Jenn Emplit said...

One of my favorite series is The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. All of the characters face challenges that I can relate to and I gained a deeper understanding of the importance of friendship in a persons life.

I love the way Ann Brashares wrote the novel by switching character's point of views, it made me want to keep reading and never stop!

I think every teenage girl would enjoy this book and they can also learn important lessons on love, family and friendship. I cant wait to read the next Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants!

andrew dalton said...

i read 1984 for the graffiti wall project and it is really good. So many modern movies and books have been inspired by 1984 and payed tribute to it.

One of the best books ive ever read.

Kicking Horse said...

I've finished this book called "Twilight". It's absolutely my favorite book of all time. It's a love story about this girl (Bella) that moves to this really little town called Forks, which ends up having vampires living there. Well, she falls in love with one of them, and the story is just about her journey through the struggles of being with him. It's incredible.


Shelby McKinney

Kicking Horse said...

I've also read the book "New Moon". It's by the same author as "Twilight", and it's actually the sequal. This one talks about how the vampire that Bella falls in love with breaks her heart...and then her troubles with the heart-ache. And everything she tries to do to get over it. It was just as good as the first one. There's actually a 3rd book coming out in a few months...I definately plan on buying all 3...


Shelby McKinney

elizabeth L said...

I have to admit that I watched The Devil Wears Prada in theaters before I actually read the book but I still loved the movie. Since the movie was so great I recently decided that I had to read the book. I just finished it and it definately blew the movie away. The way Weisberger describes Andie makes her so likable and relatable. The themes behind the book are universal and meaningful. I loved this book and consider it one of the best books I have ever read.

elizabeth L said...

We recently finished Their Eyes Were Watching God in English class. I loved Hurston's use of diction and language! The sense of local color was really strong and gave the novel more character. The plot is a little rough understanding and it takes a while to really get into the novel but the themes and characterizations make it worth the read.

blake winkles said...

I have just finished reading "The Great Gatsby". It was a very complete and well-rounded novel containing love, death, and dreams. I woulud recommend this to anyone looking for an intriguing novel.

blake winkles said...

I read the book "The Red Badge of Courage" by Stephen Crane. I thought it was a great book, even though it was a little slow to start it, it ended up being a very eventful book. I would mostly recommend this book to guys who are looking for a good war story.

Laura C said...

Last year I read the book Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson. I remember this being one of my favorite books because it was based on the obscurity of high school life and how a young girl has to cope with a secret that she is yearning to let out, even though has lost all of her friends and has no one to tell of her secret. I also watched the movie which I enjoyed.

Caroline Wright said...

In Mrs. Loftis' class we just finished reading The Great Gatsby. I LOVED IT. I like the story line, Gatsby wants Daisy so bad that he's willing to to take the rap for hitting that woman when daisy actually did it. It's in a way realistic because the good guy doesn't prevail.

Matt Brown said...

I recently read a book named Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. The book was pretty good but not very attractive to males. The book is about the main character, Janie, and her life journey. She is married three times and learns from each. She deals with doubt, racism, violence, love, and more.

Anneke said...

In English we read the book Their Eyes Were Watching God. I liked the book because Janie was a really strong woman in the book but it wasn't one of my favorites because I thought it was a little bit boring.

BetrayedAnguish said...

One of the most awesome books I've read in a really long time is Dragonsblood by Todd McCaffrey. Todd follows in his mother's (Anne McCaffrey) footsteps, writing novels based on Anne's fictional world of Pern, a rural world in which dragons are engineered in order to sear "thread" -- a mindless, voracious organism -- before it can destroy the planet. McCaffrey pulls together some key parts from vasious storylines from each of the books, including Dragon's Kin, a novel written through collaboration of both McCaffrey's. Through a detailed plot and well-planned scenario, the main character -- Lorana -- is able to find herself and who she is supposed to be in this world of amazing possibilities. The book appealed to me because Todd McCaffrey uses fantastic imagery and creates lyrics that leave you breathless after the true meaning is captured. The novel also calls to me because like myself, Lorana is a budding artist; she spends most of her free time sketching, and that gift helps her through the rough patches she has to suffer through. I highly recommend this book; however, if you're not familiar with the world of Pern, then it's recommended that you read into it first. :)

~Ashley Pruitt

BetrayedAnguish said...

I recently finished Their Eyes were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston, and am very proud of the fact that I enjoyed the book. Aside form the very negative comments and reviews the book is getting (Mainly from the male population, I see), I believe the book deserves a chance. Truthfully, at first, I was skeptical. I had seen it lying on several desks in my 1st semester Bio class and thought "How can that possibly be interesting?" In fact, it reminded me of The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne (Which I also thuroughly enjoyed), because it's not until after the first few chapters, when you're able to grasp the dialect and diction, word choice and author's style, that you are really able to immerse yourself completely into the plot and storyline of the novel.

I, as a student, personally like to challenge myself; the one reason I chose The Scarlet Letter for my reading project. The fact that the first SENTENCE of the book was a PARGRAPH within itself was enough to spur me to conquer it. Someone once told me "It is not the thickness of the binds, but the lesson that is taught that makes the book worthwhile." They must have been quoting someone insanely smart and famous, because it sounded familiar. But it also sounded right. I also apply this theory to Their Eyes; Janie is such a dynamic characher; in the beginning,s he sees the freedom that love can bring, and is determined to find it. She is then captured and enslaved into marriage by her grandmother; she finds infatuation with Joe and runs away with him, and her freedom is bound yet again. Only after Joe's death can Janie begin to find herself; she regains her freedom and finds Tea Cake, a loving, generous person. They do have struggles, yes; we can even find sympathy enough to forgive Tea Cake for beating Janie, because he is her reason for life. She ultimately lives for him in the epitome of love. His death through rabies -- getting bit by the dog, by saving Janie -- makes the story border onto a tragic love scenario. This fact, however, does not get Janie down. She strives on, and finds herself through everything that happens to her. Even in the end of the novel, Tea Cake isn't really dead to her; she can feel him within herself, among the house, hear his laughter. This goes along with the saying that even death does not conquer love.

Personally, I suggest it. If you're a girl, be prepared to cry. If you're a guy, I would say don't bother, because the book doesn't deserve to be bashed. But if you're daring, go ahead. You might even find that the heartbreaking love story of women can warm your hearts, too.

~Ashley Pruitt

sally said...

Another really good book I've read was Red by Ted Dekker. Its part of a Christian series that includes Red, White and Black. It's pretty good from what I've read. Its got alot of suspense.

Caroline Wright said...

i recently read a book called The Rise And Fall Of The 10th Grade Social Climber. It's a good book. It is about this girl who moves from living with her mom in Texas to live with her dad in New York. She goes to this new school and the "popular" crowd isn't your typical one. The school that she goes to is very non- traditional. I won't tell you anymore b/c if I did they you wouldn't have reason to read it!! Again, it is a GREAT book and i would recommend it to anyone.

P.S. I think girls would like to read it moer than guys!

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